Stick

Developed by P. A. Young at the Tomato Disease Laboratory, Agricultural Experimental Station, Jacksonville, Texas. P. A. Young describes a dominant mutant which he termed ‘Curl’ and which he located in 1953 as a mutant on a plant of the Stokesdale variety. Because the vines are distinctly non-suckering in type, Gleckler Seedsmen of Metamora, Ohio, listed Curl in 1959 as Stick. Victory Seed Company acquired seeds from the USDA’s gene bank.
Indeterminate, crinkled leaf plant (can reach up to about six feet high under the right conditions). Unique in that the leaves develop into tight clusters like pom-poms. Fruits are 3″, globe-shaped, red, on stalks that look like sticks. A very interesting plant. The plants can be grown in large pots and require staking. Very nice balanced flavor.

Varieties
Heirloom / Open Pollinated
Fruit Colors
Red
Flesh Colors
Red
Fruit Shapes
Oblate
Fruit Sizes
Saladette / Small
Culinary Uses
Salad / Slicer
Maturities
Mid-season
Plant Types
Indeterminate
Origins
Texas
Leaves
Potato / Woolly / Angora
Flavors
Well-balanced