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Jaune Flammée (Jaune Flammee)

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About Jaune Flammée (Jaune Flammee)

‘Jaune Flammée’ is a family heirloom from France, originated with Norbert Parreira of Hellimer, France. Gorgeous study in contrasts, with bright orange skin surrounding reddish when fully ripe flesh, that is a rare find in heirloom tomatoes. Fruits are slightly larger than cherry varieties, about 2 to 3 oz., borne in clusters of 6-8, 2 seed cavities, with thick walls that still remain tender and flavorful. Sweet, high-yielding and especially valued as a salad tomato for its beautiful appearance.
Indeterminate, regular leaf plants with very good yield. Early, first ripe fruit can be harvested about 55-65 days after transplant.

Culinary Use
Salad
Flavor Profile
Sweet
Flesh Color
Orange
Fruit Color
Orange
Fruit Shape
Oblate / Round
Fruit Size
Saladette
Leaf Type
Regular
Maturity
Early
Plant Type
Indeterminate
Species
Solanum lycopersicum
Variety
Heirloom

Reader Comments

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  • Avatar
    irvine@startmail.com Subscriber Gardener-master

    I have grown this tomato every year for ten years. Its seeds save true to type, and it germinates reliably. The plants will grow and thrive outdoors, even in adverse English weather conditions. I trim each truss after eight fruits have set. The average weight per fruit is between 90g-120g. It is always one of the earliest cultivars to ripen, and the acid-sweet flavours are delicious. It will continue to set fruit until the first frosts. I have never had problems with disease or blossom end rot. This is one tomato plant that seems to prefer outdoor cultivation, rather than greenhouse conditions.

    2
    • Andrea Clapp
      Andrea Clapp Editor Breeder
      Chief Operating Officer and Director of Research and Innovation

      This is great information, thank you Irvine!

      0

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